Albums

The art of the remix has been around for decades, from the fervid imaginations of Jamaican record producers like Sir Coxsone Dodd, Duke Reid or King Tubby to the disco enthusiasts of New York City, such as Tom Moulton. The remix has long acted as a song’s extension - some completely deconstructing an idea or sound, others devastating dancefloors or reaching entirely new audiences.

For Delta Nove, the past decade has been both transformational and tragic. Following their last record, Imaginary Conversations, the former Jambase “Road Warriors of the Year” chose to slow down their once-relentless touring schedule to stay closer to home, focusing on their families and their individual careers while continuing to collaborate as Delta Nove.

Guitarist, bandleader, and composer Steve Kimock already had an impressively diverse backdrop of music before co-founding KIMOCK, taking a notion from a creative apex following his previous album, the deeply personal and experimental Last Danger of Frost. The veteran multi-genre improvisor admitted in an interview with Grateful Web that he wanted to explore a side his musical self that was lesser seen onstage. His potently cascading compositions have always taken focus, each song is a journey, and the payoff is blissful yet unpredictable.

On September 15th The Lil Smokies graced the world with their sophomore studio album, "Changing Shades."  For anyone unfamiliar with the Lil Smokies, they are certainly a band on the move. Winners or the 2015 Telluride Bluegrass Band Competition, they have catapulted themselves into the spotlight amongst some of the bluegrass greats. Hailing from Missoula, MT, the Lil Smokies played over 175 shows in 2016 alone.

Of the living legendary Jazz musicians of the 20th century, few perform with such purpose and poise as Mahavishnu John McLaughlin. As the groundbreaking Jazz-fusion originating guitarist has put it in two separate interviews with Grateful Web, it’s all out of love. Love for life, love for the players in his earth-shattering 4th Dimension band, love for exploration, love for all people.

“Music is like color,” Lukas Nelson has said. “When I listen to the musicians who affected me when I was growing up, I take from the primary colors to find my foundation. Then I apply secondary colors and the music becomes more and more complex.”

It’s bewildering how many devoted fans are out there of late guitar and American music icon Jerry Garcia that never saw him play a single show. Yet they know all about the live music of Grateful Dead and Jerry Garcia Band. They can explore the evolutions and changes in form, structure, and exploration. This is of course due to the tireless efforts of band insider sound technicians and the extended taper culture that surrounded.

Boris Garcia’s new album Around Some Corner is concurrently refreshing and reminiscent. Producer Tim Carbone gelled conspicuously with the pop-Americana sextet, polishing off their most developed offering to date. The Philadelphia based group doesn’t seem to care about proving themselves as genre bending or cutting edge since their songwriting, and musical sincerity shines beyond anything contrived.

It’s peculiar to think about, but the album, as we know, it is dying off. The single already takes precedent, for those bands that are looking to reach the widest number of listens on the pop charts. The major upside to the current state of the music business is that the live concert experience has taken precedent as the best way to make it as a musician. One of the most admirable acts out there right now, gaining the adoration of loyal fans while releasing quality albums, is progressive grass sextet the Infamous Stringdusters.

While Cycles has had a couple EP’s available on Spotify to listen to, they had still yet to record a debut album in the studio, until last week when they released their new album “Vacation”.  Over the course of the past couple of years the band has been together, they have created an extremely large amount of material that would leave one wondering; which songs would make the cut for the new album, and how they would sound in the studio compared to the live setting that many fans around the country have gotten used to.  For those o

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